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      Dennis J. Stevens, PhD
Criminology Syllabus

 

 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA CHARLOTTE

SOCY 3173:001 Criminology   

Syllabus: Spring 3 Semester Hours

 

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Dennis J. Stevens   PHONE: (704)687-2252  

OFFICE: FRT 106, Soc Dept, 4th Floor            EMAIL:  

OFFICE HOURS:  T-Th                              DAYS, TIME, ROOM: T-Th: 9:30-10:45 Friday 137 

REQUIRED TEXTS (3): Stevens, Inside the Mind of a Serial Rapist, Wicked Women, and The Media and Criminal Justice: The CSI Effect.                        

 
COURSE DISCRIPTION

 

Prerequisite: SOCY1101. Nature and historical development of crime and political-economic organization of crime, criminal law, and theories of crime causation. Emphasis on socialization perspectives linked to children who share the behavioral characteristics of potential criminally violent offenders.

 
COURSE OBJECTIVES
 

·  Develop an informed understanding of the causes of crime and society's response to criminal behavior.

·  Refine analytical, reasoning, and connective abilities...learning to see the forest through the trees — plus how each aspect of the trees (each theory and/or social variable) are connected and interdependent making up the forest.

·  Develop a theoretical knowledge base regarding crime and crime's role in society which is necessary for students' future course, field, and professional work. 

 
SCHEDULE: SOCY3173:001 CRIMINOLOGY Spring 2012
 
 

Day

Date

Activities

Tuesday

1/10

Introduction to Criminology including Definition and Syllabus Review 

Thursday

1/12

CSI Effect Ch 1 pps. 1-12

Tuesday

1/17

CSI Effect Ch 1 pps. 13-20

Thursday

1/19

Group 1: CSI Effect Ch 2 Motion Pictures pps. 29-46

Tuesday

1/24

Group 2: CSI Effect Ch 3 War on Crime pps. 51-77

Thursday

1/26

Group 3: CSI Effect Ch 4 War on Sex Offenders and Poverty pps. 89-90

Tuesday

1/31

Group 4: CSI Effect Ch 4 War on Sex Offenders and Poverty pps. 90-110  

Thursday

2/2

Group 5: Wicked Women pps. 1-40  

Tuesday

2/7

Exam 1:  CSI Ch1-4 plus all lectures (including Wicked Women 1-40) & all presentations 

Thursday

2/9

Group 6: CSI Effect Ch 5 Terrorism and Immigrants pps. 121-127 

Tuesday

2/14

Group 7: CSI Effect Ch 5 Terrorism/Immigrants pps. 127-148; 

Thursday

2/16

Group 8: CSI Effect Ch 6 Crime Scene Investigations pps. 157-170   

Tuesday

2/21

Group 9: CSI Effect Ch 6 Crime Scene pps. 170-174

Thursday

2/23

Group 10:  Wicked Women 41-71

Tuesday

2/28

Group 11:  Wicked Women pps. 72-90

Thursday

3/1

Exam 2: CSI Effect Ch 5-6 Wicked Women pps. 41-90 plus all lectures and presentations    

Tuesday

3/6

Spring Break

Thursday 

3/8

Spring Break

Tuesday

3/13

Group 12: CSI Effect Ch 7 Prosecutors pps. 197-220     

Thursday

3/15

Debate I  

Tuesday

3/20

Group 13: CSI Effect Ch 8 Wrongful Con pps. 227-259;  Inside Introduction pps. 1-26

Thursday

3/22

Group 14: Wicked Women balance of book 

Tuesday

3/27

Debate II   

Thursday

3/29

Group 15: CSI Effect Ch 9 The Death Penalty pps. 271-301

Tuesday

4/3

Group 16: Inside the Mind pps. 27-40

Thursday

4/5

Group 17: CSI Effect: 10 Methods and Findings pps. 311-329

Tuesday

4/10

Debate III  

Thursday

4/12

Group 18: CSI Effect Ch 11 Recommendations to Reduce pps. 331-358 & Inside pps. 41-86 

Tuesday

4/17

Exam 3: CSI Effect Ch 7-11, Inside 1-87, and all lectures and presentations

Thursday

4/19

Groups 19 & 20: Lecture Psychological Profile of Predators

Tuesday

4/24

Final Paper Due and Extra Credit Presentations (time permitting)

Thursday

4/26

Final Presentations (time permitting) 

Tuesday

5/1

TBA

 
 
Your instructor will not necessarily lecture on each and every topic in your text, but you are responsible for the assigned readings on each exam. Additionally, topics not in your text, but lectured on will be in your exams.

 

EXPECTATIONS

 

  • To be successful in this course, students are required to attend all classes: more than 3 absences (excused or not) a student cannot expect an A at the option of your instructor. Expect problems? Talk to me.
  • Mandatory attendance unless arranged in advance and your instructor accepts your explanation.  
  • The syllabus is tentative and subject to change at the option of your instructor.  
  • Your instructor will not be able to supply you with any class notes because of an absence.
  • You are responsible for class notes and any changes to the syllabus.
  • Powerpoint lectures are not distributed to students. 
  • Three exams are provided during the semester and the lowest score is dropped. No make-up dates.
  • Final Exam is a Paper. It can be turned in anytime during the semester. Late papers (4/24/12 at the beginning of the class) are not acceptable regardless of the reason. Complete this assignment early and get it out of the way.          
  • Late arrivals (after 10 min), cell phones, laptops, electronic device, and eating are unacceptable; students will be considered absent if he or she persists in rude and unacceptable behavior.    
  • Students are responsible for the context of all lectures regardless if those lectures fit the text or not.
  • Your instructor will not necessarily lecture on each and every topic in your texts, but you are responsible for the assigned readings on the exams and all lectures.
  • Students will be called upon during class and it’s expected that s/he will have to provide appropriate responses and be respectful of other students and your instructor.
  • Recording devices are not allowed in this course.
  • Class papers cannot contain quotes (word for word) from resources. Paraphrase and cite sources. 
  • All assignments must be a hard copy and delivered at the beginning of class, emailed assignments not accepted.
  • All paper assignments must contain citations and reference page. Websites must contain date retrieved (by you) organizational name, article title, author/s’ name if available.
  • There are no rewrites for any paper. Do it right the first time.  
  • Emails will not be answered if your question can be found in the syllabus.
  • Dictionaries, textbooks, Wikipedia, newspapers, encyclopedias and Bibles are not acceptable references.
  • Your 800 ID, name, and Course number must be on all classroom materials including exams and papers.  
  • Group papers and final papers are not returned, make a copy.
  • If you experience issues or conflicts with any of the above expectations, feel free to contact me and we’ll work things out.    
  • Students who attend all classes, participate at a reasonable level, try hard to accomplish their goals are those students who most likely will be rewarded with better evaluations at the end of the term than those who don’t.  

 Group Paper and Presentation

 

A group (selected by instructor) of 3-5 students, meet together and cooperate in a group effort centered on the lectured topic designated during the group's due date; group presentation dates are in the syllabus. Each student prepares 2 pages max: typed, appropriate university standards, name, 800 ID, prepared in a professional writing style: Socy, Psy, and CJ major use ASA or APA, others MLA on his or her part of the presentation and 2 PowerPoint slides containing less than 10 words (plus your name on each slide) each and appropriate pictures if desired. No quotes allowed from resources, paraphrase information. Paper must contain two outside references preferably empirical evidence, cited in work and detailed on page 3. No title page. Paper grade: up to 100 points. Late papers might be accepted only on the day it is due and will be reduced by 10 points. Late is after class starts. Entire group makes a single presentation — put all PowerPoint slides from each member on a single flash-drive (do not email). List all group member names on the first slide and each member shows his or her name at the bottom of PowerPoint. Leader introduces group members and topic. Maximum group time 15 minutes and 2 slides per group member.  Presentation worth 25 points each. It is peer-reviewed on 1-5 scale (converted later). No make-up for presentation. All students must be in a group and if enrolling into this class late, should talk to students and get into a group (approval required). Students will be evaluated by their peers: eye contact with audience, knowledge of topic and presentation materials, presentation style, and communication skills among other perspectives.  Students who don't know his/her info during the presentation will be asked to stop presentation and can expect a loss of 25 points.         

  

 

Exams

 

Three multiple choice exams are planned to consist of 50 multiple questions. See Schedule for dates. Lowest score is dropped. No makeup exams. Questions are based on assigned readings, lectures, and student presentations.

 

Debate

 

Your instructor will select teams. Meet in your group as time permits. Elect a leader who will facilitate the success of your project. Decide on how to "attack the problem in order to win." Discuss the possibilities. Delegate or negotiate specific areas for research. Each member of the team might have a specific area and will research his or her area of concern. There are 2 topics, 2 teams (students cannot participate in both teams).  

 

          Individual Responsibility: each student types a three-page (3 pages of text -10) paper plus a reference page consisting of 4 references minimum: 1 this class' textbook, 2 empirical research pieces, 1 any source except NO dictionaries, encyclopedias (especially Wikipedia), and bibles. Website references must include titles and organizational names, and retrieved data. References must be verifiable. NO QUOTE POLICY; work must be in your own words but your sources must be cited. APA citation system applies for majors; MLA for others.             

         Requirements: no title page and no folders; full heading with your name, 800 number, class name, date; include a 'centered' title, an introduction paragraph complete with three reasons qualifying your position. Each preceding paragraph should represent one of the qualifying reasons which should include citations. The fifth paragraph should be a conclusion including a recommendation (Note: many students fall down on this request losing 5 pts) reflecting the above three paragraphs. Your debate papers will be collected before the debate; make note-cards. Winners: 10 points extra credit determined by student evaluations; all team members must contribute to the debate process to receive points. Remember, it isn't that you're right or wrong, you and your team must support your thoughts with through logical, verifiable, and empirical evidence. Topic Team I: criminally violent offenders are born (yes or no). Topic Team II: the criminal justice system (cops, courts, and corrections) impact on criminally violent behavior (yes or no).      

 

Final Paper

All students are expected to develop a final paper for this class. Look upon this assignment as a learning experience and write about things that you really want to learn such as marriage and the family, crime, social stratification, politics, foreign affairs, immigration, drugs and so on. Topic, any (other than your group presentation or debate topic and should be approved) linked to sociology but the paper must link directly with sociological theory and real-world application. Requirements: 6 pages minimum containing 4 references minimum of which 2 are original studies (empirical evidence) from academic journals, and 2 other references (none from dictionaries, encyclopedias, or textbooks), plus reference page, university standards apply, written in an APA, ASA format for Sociology, Psychology, and Criminal Justice majors (endnote system is ok providing the first endnote is number 1 and so on) or MLA for other majors or they can chose APA or ASA. Doing a paper on the church or school sports, for instance, is high school stuff. I want a paper that genuinely addresses a sociological perspective linked to performance or consequences.  

No quote policy applies in your paper. That is, information in your paper must be in your own words but cite your sources. Presentation of this paper is voluntary and provides 25 extra credit points. It consists of 5-8 PowerPoints, peer-reviewed on a 1-5 scale (converted). No makeup dates for late paper or presentation. Two students can work together (8 pages, 6 ref) but both receive the same grade regardless of who does what. One essay is turned in. Both students must participate in the presentation for extra credit. Paper is due 11/29/11 at the beginning of class, extra credit presentations any time (time permitting) but 11/29 and 12/1 are designated as final paper presentation days. No presentation time available 12/6. Students can turn in paper and make the presentation any time during the semester with the approval of the instructor. Students in Marriage/Family and Criminology can elect to write one paper and provide one presentation for both classes: requirements are similar to two students writing above. Select a topic that applies to both courses. Two students, both Marriage and Criminology — one paper, one presentation, requirements: 10 pages, 8 outside references. 

 

GRADING PROCESS

 

 

What

Comments

#

Point Value

Points

Percent

Exams (lowest score dropped)

No Make-ups

3

100

200

38%

Debate

No Make-ups

1

100

100

19%

Group Participation Paper

No Make-ups

1

100

100

19%

Presentation: peer reviewed

No Make-ups

1

 25

 25

05%

Final Project Paper

No Make-ups

1

100

100

19%

Total *percents rounded

 

 

 

525

100%*

 

GRADES

 

90%-100%  525-472 = A (3 absences or more, student cannot earn an A, regardless of reason) 

80%-89%    420-471 = B (4 absences or more, student cannot earn a B, regardless of the reason)

70%-79%    367-419 = C (5 absences or more, student cannot earn a C, regardless of the reason)

60%-69%    315-366 = D

59% -1%     314-001 = F

 

DISABILITIES

Reasonable accommodation will be made for those with disabilities. Contact Disability Services in the Academic Development Center, N201, Whitten University Center, for an evaluation, then make an appointment to see me, or stop by during my office hours.

HONOR CODE

          Instances of academic dishonesty (including, but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism) will be dealt with strictly and according to University policies.  Any Quiz or assignment that reflects academic dishonesty will receive a score of "0" on the assignment and students handing in such material may be subject to further disciplinary action at the professor's discretion.  If you are unsure what constitutes academic dishonesty, consult the University of North Carolina-Charlotte Code of Student Academic Integrity at http://www.legal.uncc.edu/policies/ps-105.html

Typical examples: Knowingly allowing another to copy from one's paper during an examination or test; knowingly distributing test questions or substantive information about the material to be tested before the scheduled exercise; collaborating on academic work knowing that the collaboration will not be reported; taking an examination or test for another student, or signing a false name on an academic exercise. (NOTE: Collaboration and sharing information are characteristics of academic communities. These become violations when they involve dishonesty.  Do not copy and paste from any source.